MRI Question (Pulling Feeling)

If you have 7 Teslas on your implant, I expect your hand will be quite thoroughly crushed anyway.

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Typical Hospital MRI machines are usually somewhere in the 1.5-3 Teslas range, as far as I know. Some might go upto 6 or 7 if they’re really damn new (in medical terms, so like… the last 3 ish years haha) and used for research more than typical use. So it might be POSSIBLE to get an MRI that’s 7+ Teslas, but seems unlikely to be common, at least for now.

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TIL that a 16 Tesla magnetic field can cause small animals and plants to paramagnetically levitate

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That’s pretty neat… and weird… but most neat haha.

Apparently human scanners go to 10.5 Tesla

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Both. It’s impossible to predict how a magnet will interact with an MRI field, and there are many different MRI designs which produce different shaped fields and work somewhat differently as well. Anecdotal evidence suggests that very small magnets (m31) could be “held” in place with external force, but even slightly larger ones caused so much pain trying to move and exit tissue that they had to abort the MRI scan. Of course these stories come from people who hid the fact they had magnet implants from MRI technicians, and of course these stories cannot be confirmed… so we really suggest that this not be something our customers experiment with… if you’re going in for an MRI, have your magnets removed before the procedure.

Most hospitals use 1.5T to 3T machines… labs and universities doing medical imaging studies can get up to 7T.

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Luckily in this case, @David86 only has an xNT

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Ah yes, I didn’t think about the pain.

So for smaller magnets, it comes down to pain of removal and replanting vs pain of MRI scanner trying to rip out the magnet.

I wonder if those machines have a “test mode” - as in, provided the technician is sympathetic, you could perhaps walk up to them and ask them to slowly “turn up the volume” and see if it gets too unpleasant before reaching the level needed for the exam proper.

I work very limited with MRI machines at work. They are always “on” so I am not sure how close you should even get to it with a magnet. The test would just be walking towards it.

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Yes MRIs are “always on” usually. They use super conductors for most MRIs (I think some use permanent magnets) and require “quenching” to turn them off. This can damage the machine and costs a lot of coolant (liquid helium usually).

Stumbled across this earlier and it seemed interesting:

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Here is a video of a MRI being quenched if it interests anyone:

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Interesting. I didn’t know them machines were on all the time.

I very much hope that plume of white smoke in the video wasn’t helium being vented out. That would be shameful, considering the world will soon run out of the stuff.

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That is exactly what it is (afaik), as I said it wastes a lot of coolant.

I believe it is only intended to be an emergency or end of life event and given machines like that are old I doubt the recycling of the coolant was even considered.

Very much so. Also need to clear people out in case it doesn’t vent correctly.

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This was really cool to watch and learn about, thanks!

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Yeah but death by helium would sound hilarious.

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Go out on a high note? so to speak?

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Or we could unintentionally become super human, just like no good, lazy pos, grandpa Joe.

part-2

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I don’t always laugh for three minutes, but when I do it’s because that was fucking funny.

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Hey All,
So I wanted to update everyone on my MRI.

so I ended up having an MRI on friday after I sent the MRI PDF from Dangerousthings.com and also the link to the testing page.
I spoke with the Technician before I had the scan about it and they said it will be fine.

so I stuck my hand in the machine same as I did on monday and had no effect this time (clearly it was all in my head) My scan went for 30 mins and to say I didn’t enjoy myself would be an understatement.

I was sure I felt my chip move and buzz while I was in the scanner, but my whole body also buzzed while in it.

What I can say is moving forward I won’t worry about having a scan done again.

Also if anyone was wondering, the scan I had was a 1.5 Tesla, it was loud and not fun. After the scan where the chip is in my hand felt warm and itchy to me, to my partner it was cold, so clearly it was all in my head. 2 days later and its fine with no issue at all.

Also my chip still works fine I tested it as soon as I got home.

Thanks to everyone that responded and thanks for all the links and info.

Thanks David

Edit: added Links

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