Best Resources to Learn About RFID?

Hey guys. Can you point me to books and sites to learn the fundamentals of rfid?

I’m looking for learn more about file types, formatting, programming, authentication, etc. Most of what I’ve found just through googling relates to things like using rf tags for inventory tracking…

RFID TOYS
cool projects for home, office and entertainment

Lots of good info throughout, especially the early chapters, and some more good learnings to pick out in the project sections
images (23)

Some of the links are dead, and some of the tech now has been replaced, but still some really good info for everybody

Sample

Chapter
1:
Getting
Started
with
RFID
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
What Is RFID? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Early RFID — IFF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
RFID Tags and Interrogators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Contemporary Uses of RFID. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
RFID Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
RFID Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Data Encoding and Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Project Preparations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Safety. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

What This Book Covers
The projects in this book cover different RFID technologies using various frequency ranges
and power levels.The book features both passive and active RFID systems, as well as the different
kinds of antenna systems each type of technology uses.
Most of the projects deal with passive RFID.The reason for this is that low-frequency and
high-frequency passive RFID systems are both cheap and intriguing. Because passive RFID
transponders, or tags, do not require a battery or internal power source, they do not have a
finite lifespan.The contactless nature of RFID enables you to use it when direct contact or
even line-of-sight is not possible.
Access control is one of the most common applications that RFID is used for today. By identifying
authorized personnel via RFID, people don’t even have to remove the RFID access card
from their purses or wallets; they can just wave it in front of the sensor and gain entry.This
book contains several RFID-based solutions for various types of access control situations.
Passive systems are also used to help manage supply chains and inventory. Many businesses
employ RFID in what are known as smart shelves.These are shelves that contain reader hardware
that can take a real-time inventory of tagged items resting on, or sometimes in, the smart
shelf.These shelves can also actively monitor these items to initiate a business process when
the inventory gets too low, like a restocking order for example. I’ll show you how to build your
own smart shelf that you can use to keep an eye on any tagged items you want, including your
DVD collection.
Active RFID systems use powered tags that contain an internal power source or battery.
Because these tags have a battery, they also have a limited lifespan. Generally, tags are designed
to have a 3- to 5-year useful life before they need to be replaced.The advantage of active
RFID, however, is the extremely long range these systems are capable of when compared to
passive RFID systems. Active RFID can be used to monitor and track personnel and/or objects
that are either difficult to control (stand here while we scan you), or aren’t practically accessible
(boxes stacked in a shipping truck). Because active tags transmit their information constantly,
they can also be employed by high-end asset monitoring solutions that require flexible but
rock-solid detection of missing assets. I’ve dedicated a couple chapters to active RFID, showing
you how you can use it to track people and monitor assets.
There are some types of active and passive RFID tags that can be used to store data as well.
Expanding their usefulness beyond simple identification, writable tags enhance the spectrum of
possible applic
how to leverage this data storage capability to get more functionality out of your RFID applications
for less money.
The world of RFID is a rapidly growing realm of possibilities. Businesses, organizations, and
everyday people are making use of RFID in unique and amazing ways. In an effort to get you
thinking creatively about RFID, the final chapter in this book covers some interesting ways
people are using RFID in their homes and businesses.
What You Need to Use This Book
To build the projects in this book, you’ll need to know how to handle a soldering iron and have
plenty of spare wire around. Some imagination and patience won’t hurt either, as you might not
have access to exactly the same hardware and equipment shown in this book.
Access to the Internet is a must because you’ll need to order parts and visit www.rfidtoys
.net to download software and/or source code. You can also access the forums on www
.rfidtoys.net to get help building your projects, post your own project suggestions, and
exchange information and ideas with others.
Other than that, some imagination and a lot of enthusiasm

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This Adafruit guide is really helpful if you’re trying to understand the structure of NFC, which is a subset of RFID.

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Thanks guys. That’s exactly the kind of stuff I was looking for…

dngr.us/chips101 ?

Thanks, Amal. I’ve read all through that… Looking to go a little deeper. I bought your book yesterday, and while I’m traveling now, I’m looking forward to it when I get home. I also bought a few of the “also boughts” and other suggested titles. Thanks for all you!

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We’ve got a massive KB here
https://tagbase.ksec.co.uk/