MRI Question (Pulling Feeling)

The ferrite core would have some iron in it… but not much.

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I can’t speak on behalf of Amal / DT, but here is MY take, for what it is worth

my opinion

Lawyers, :balance_scale: Not only this specific MRI question, but if you read any of Amals answers, he is stuck between a rock and hard place. :person_climbing:
He officially provides all the information he can without giving medical advice, although I’m sure he would want to, and I’m also sure he is more than capable of doing so, but just can’t for liable reasons. :man_judge:
You will see him step in to stop somebody from doing something stupid or dangerous :stop_sign: , but he will word it in a way where, he points out the “mistake”, but not give actual advice. ( difficult for him I bet :moneybag: ) SO advice on what NOT to do…Which is NOT by default on what TO do

my opinion

That’s where we come in, We can / should direct people back to Amals recommendations ie. Get it installed at a professional installer But we have the luxury of giving anecdotes and personal experiences, recommendations, how we have done it, what we would do.

Amal CANT do that, I don’t blame him.

my opinion

Now to answer the question with

my opinion

If it was me in the same situation, I would read and watch the tests that Dangerous Things carried out, and provided some interesting information, but cleverly NOT advice.

I would make my own decision on the research that I carried out, In this case, I/me/personally would go through the MRI with no concerns (but @Rosco suggestion of taping the implant site was also a good one).

If I wasn’t clear, this is purely

my opinion

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Ah yes, true that. I forgot about the ferrite.

Maybe we should ask some Vets. What they do if they have to make a MRI on a chipped Pet?

A least in switzerland we have more chipped Pets than chipped People…

All very good points and questions, I’m still 50/50 about it all, part of me wants to just get the MRI done and see what happens, the other part of me wants to cut it out, have the scan and then put it back in (not sure if that safe) , as its my front door key, so without it I have to put a pin in or have to carry a tag for the door with me everywhere.

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You’ll be fine

MRI Compatibility document

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They have only been tested and certified upto 7 teslas…do you know how many teslas the mri machine had

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Haha, you beat me to it lol. I was thinking about it in my sleep haha (don’t worry I’m weired like that).

Would be good to know what strength field it has.

This dosnt mean its not safe (correct me if I’m wrong but the 7 tesla mri had no impact at all)

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If you have 7 Teslas on your implant, I expect your hand will be quite thoroughly crushed anyway.

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Typical Hospital MRI machines are usually somewhere in the 1.5-3 Teslas range, as far as I know. Some might go upto 6 or 7 if they’re really damn new (in medical terms, so like… the last 3 ish years haha) and used for research more than typical use. So it might be POSSIBLE to get an MRI that’s 7+ Teslas, but seems unlikely to be common, at least for now.

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TIL that a 16 Tesla magnetic field can cause small animals and plants to paramagnetically levitate

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That’s pretty neat… and weird… but most neat haha.

Apparently human scanners go to 10.5 Tesla

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Both. It’s impossible to predict how a magnet will interact with an MRI field, and there are many different MRI designs which produce different shaped fields and work somewhat differently as well. Anecdotal evidence suggests that very small magnets (m31) could be “held” in place with external force, but even slightly larger ones caused so much pain trying to move and exit tissue that they had to abort the MRI scan. Of course these stories come from people who hid the fact they had magnet implants from MRI technicians, and of course these stories cannot be confirmed… so we really suggest that this not be something our customers experiment with… if you’re going in for an MRI, have your magnets removed before the procedure.

Most hospitals use 1.5T to 3T machines… labs and universities doing medical imaging studies can get up to 7T.

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Luckily in this case, @David86 only has an xNT

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Ah yes, I didn’t think about the pain.

So for smaller magnets, it comes down to pain of removal and replanting vs pain of MRI scanner trying to rip out the magnet.

I wonder if those machines have a “test mode” - as in, provided the technician is sympathetic, you could perhaps walk up to them and ask them to slowly “turn up the volume” and see if it gets too unpleasant before reaching the level needed for the exam proper.

I work very limited with MRI machines at work. They are always “on” so I am not sure how close you should even get to it with a magnet. The test would just be walking towards it.

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Yes MRIs are “always on” usually. They use super conductors for most MRIs (I think some use permanent magnets) and require “quenching” to turn them off. This can damage the machine and costs a lot of coolant (liquid helium usually).

Stumbled across this earlier and it seemed interesting:

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Here is a video of a MRI being quenched if it interests anyone:

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Interesting. I didn’t know them machines were on all the time.

I very much hope that plume of white smoke in the video wasn’t helium being vented out. That would be shameful, considering the world will soon run out of the stuff.

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