New Proposed Law - Utah, US

Hi there! I own a body piercing studio with my husband and he has been doing implants for customers maybe 1-2 times a month over the last few years. Nowhere in our current state regulations does it mention implants so we’ve never had an issue. I just received an email from the State (Utah, US) today asking for feedback on newly proposed body art and piercing regulations. In it it states that nothing can be implanted under the skin. I believe they mean to ban silicone implants that create shapes under the skin and did not realize that it would make implanting chips illegal for us to preform.

Luckily, they seem very open to our professional knowledge and feedback on the proposed changes, and I plan to speak to them about it. I’m going to explain that it’s safer and cleaner for us to be doing it for people rather than them doing it in their homes given our bloodborne pathogens and first aid training, and the fact that we are a facility that is already licensed to stab people and stick stuff in their skin. (LOL!). I’m also going to bring up the fact that BioHacking is only getting more popular and isn’t going to go away anytime soon and would be best to be discussed while these new regulations are being considered. Edit to clarify! Obviously they can’t stop anyone from doing it themselves at home… and I definitely wouldn’t want to stop anyone who wants to do it on their own. But some people really do prefer us to help them. :slight_smile:

I was wondering if anyone has run across this yet and has any advice and/or more information I could provide to the State when I go in to talk to them. Thanks!! ~ Tara

3 Likes

Anastasia Synn recently provided testimony to educate her legislators about biohacking in Las Vegas when they were attempting to implement a similarly uninformed ban. You could take some pointers from her testimony:

Thanks for the heads up, btw. I’ll let the Transhumanists know.

2 Likes

@ensopiercing
Thank you for your work! If you have any more information, please keep me informed. I am a part of an informal group in Utah as part of 801labs that are very interested in the Chip implants (like sold here at dangerousthings.com).

If you know of any testimony or meetings we can attend, please let me know.

Could be related to this recent Utah Supreme Court case about medical implants:

As a bit of information, here are the various county rules I was able to find:

Davis county:

weber county:-
http://www.webermorganhealth.org/administration/regulations/documents/regs_bodyart.pdf

Utah county:
http://www.utahcounty.gov/Dept2/Health/UCHD/1999%2099-02%20REGULATION%20FOR%20BODY%20ART%20FACILITIES.pdf

SLC County:


Davis county seems very anti-implantation. They put it under the ‘prohibited acts’ section.

1 Like

Hey Enso - You have done at least one of my implants, and I work in local government. If you know of any town-halls or other testimony meetings that I could assist with, please let me know.

Ben@Cybersquidz.com

Does the email contain the verbiage of the proposed law, or a link to the current verbiage being proposed? Can you post it?

This is a good direction, however I also think it is important to point out the following facts;

  1. A silicone implant requires scalpel work and sutures, which are clearly medical tools and techniques.

  2. A chip implant goes no deeper into tissue than a typical body piercing, and uses the same tools and techniques (pushing a needle through the skin).

  3. Done by a professional, placing a chip implant carries less risk to the customer than a body piercing. Aftercare is as simple as leaving a basic adhesive bandage on, and skin closure takes only minutes to hours for a scab to form and protect the wound from infection. Conversly, body piercings require complex aftercare and take days to close.

In short, the law should focus on tools (needles and bandages, not scalpels and sutures) and techniques (pushing needles through skin) rather than specific terms like “implants”.