Questions for those with self installation experience

So at this point I’ve got 5 implants done. All on my own. I think I’ve got things covered but just out of curiosity I have some questions.

  1. About half way through 2 of my procedures I’ve noticed blood pooling up inside the injector. I first noticed this with my xLED install as the injector is clear. Has anyone had this happen before? Or is it normal? I didn’t have any bruising at all and it healed up perfectly with no pain.

  2. Is anyone else super skinny as well and have you done an injection between the metacarpals? I feel it would be an easy procedure but my veins are very prominent making me question doing one on the top of my hand.

  3. Has anyone found a good solution to tenting the skin? I have been using a spring clamp and putting my hand above my head and allowing gravity to pull the skin down

1 Like

I’ll let others answer the other questions as I would consider myself only an amateur when it comes to installing, but this one I can add my opinion to. I bought a hemostat set on Amazon which I autoclaved using my Instapot. Then I took a rubber band around the end to make it grip on the skin and viola. Not my ideas though. Credit to SparkFun for the hemostat-rubberband idea, and credit to the researchers at Dakota State for the research on using an Instapot as an autoclave. Although I would caution don’t put a hemostat cleaned in this method on the actual injection site, and I would still disinfect where you touch it with the included wipe like you should be with your glove.

2 Likes

I probably shouldn’t say anything as I really can’t contribute a lot.

I wouldn’t call myself super skinny, but hopefully without sounding like a douche, I would describe myself more closer to athletic, so some prominent vascularity and tendons visible, therefore I would suggest it would make it easier to see what you are doing (Like diving into a lagoon vs into a mud pool)


I imagine, yours would be much more clear to see, and also when you wiggle your fingers you can see the path of your tendons and can identify likely spots between tendons at rest and when moving and also where large veins are not…

So this is why I really replied, and a little “out of the box” but what about tenting with your fingers BUT… Clamp the syringe lightly in a vice and push your hand into the needle rather than needle into hand???
I dont know what others would think about this, and I am definately not reccomending it. nor have I tried it (I have an able assistant to help me with mine), but if I didn’t, I would definitely consider this

EDIT

I would endorse this over my ridiculous :face_with_raised_eyebrow::roll_eyes: vice :clamp: idea if you have a hemostat available to you :wink:

Yes I supposed it does make it easier being able to see veins and tendons. I guess my concern now is how close can you get to veins and tendons before it becomes problematic? Does having a tag above your tendons cause any trouble?

I do not have an instapot or hemostats but I do have a vice, might have to that out lol. I’m trying to find a way to hang my spring clamp from something so that I don’t have to flip my hand over my head. I would only have to put tension on a string to pull the skin up.

Oh, that is simple, see the demonstration below
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
contorsionist

SORRY, I will let you get some sensible answers now…

2 Likes

I get help from my local piercer - not because I couldn’t do the injection on my own at this point, but because he and I invariably end up boozing up and having a good time at the local bar afterwards :slight_smile:

1 Like

I am far from super skinny, but like pilgrimsmaster I have big, prominent veins on the back of my hands. My installer actually nicked one and there was a nickel size hematoma visible for less than a day after the injection. We saw the vein, then it zigged when we thought it zagged… It quickly dissipated, healed, and hasn’t been an issue at all.

So, I’d be careful, and it can happen regardless of who does it, but it isn’t catastrophic if you hit one.

1 Like

Throw a tourniquet on your arm to see where your veins are in your hand. When they are full, you can play with them a bit to see if they roll and how. If you hit one, just pull the needle out and hold pressure. Veins will repair on their own, or make a new path. I would be more concerned with hitting an artery.

2 Likes