What are you making ⚒️ / 3D printing 🖨

Just saying, my offer stands.

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What am I going to do in the coming werewolf/vampire apocalypse? Throw it by hand like some kind of savage? No no no lol

The pew pew seed, must be able to be pew pew’d

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It’s pretty much mostly shaped like a bullet. Just shave and shape it, and load it up

Just for the sake of discussion. Do you suppose it would work if you took a regular copper clad bullet and gave it a 100% pure silver coating? If I remember right it should be the silver in the heart that kills the werewolf right?

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I’ll need a werewolf…. For scientific purposes

…probably a bunch if we want statistical significance

(And this is how the werewolf apocalypse began)

To be clear, I’m probably making things harder than I need to sure… but I want it to seem or feel genuine to generic lore… again mostly for lulz because I’m a nerd

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Instead of casting your bullet, why not turn it on a lathe? That way you’d get exact control over final dimensions and shape.

Also, consult a gun nut before you get too far. If the silver won’t let the rifling cut grooves in it or something weird, you could have a bad bad day.

There are plenty of bullets that are far harder, solid turned copper, steel jacket etc

It mostly effects barrel life first, but something tells me I’m not going to shoot enough silver to do squat

this bullet will also be significantly lighter

It’s probably going to be a pretty inefficient loading since I’m not going to put gas checks, and limited engagement surfaces… probably a non aggressive powder charge also

I mostly just want it to be able to go bang, that’s enough for me

Lathe IS an option, I’ve only avoided it for 2 reasons so far,

  1. I don’t have a lathe :sweat_smile:

  2. It would hurt to see silver chips go everywhere…
    (Sure it’s not actually worth much… and it might be recoverable-ish… just feels hurtful)

  3. There’s just something satisfying about the idea of casting?

If I really wanted, I could probably get a bullet mold made with shrinkage rate in mind, and be able to make a LOT of them but that’s probably more than I want to spend for a few lulz

… actually that might be a fairly reasonable approach…. 100-150$… for a good and reusable option

I could make a few extra to recoop my costs…. I wouldn’t sell directly because FFL stuff… but I could sell some to a buddy of mine who runs a very successful and… “interesting” ammo company

Sounds like a lot, but considering molding supplies and effort to do lost-casting… might be reasonable

Edit… again…

Bler, apparently there are even more ways silver is a pain in regards to casting… spru insulation and stuff

So back to either a one-off casting by myself, or have someone lathe it for me… I’d still likely need to get the silver into round bar of approximate dimensions… so that’s still possibly casting work… :weary:… stupid fixation is going to be a pain

APMEX for when you’re ready.

They have lots of options besides shot. Just thought that’d be easiest to measure out for melting.

Ive been making a few accessories for my “new” 1936 south bend …
finally printed a dial holder (not my design on this one).

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I absolutely love the idea of 3D printing things for old lathes. Using additive manufacturing to upgrade subtractive manufacturing.

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I look forward to 3D extruders added to the head of a 5 axis mill… the actual mechanics are probably child’s play…. The slicing software is probably crazy complicated

I don’t think that doing so would give you any advantages over having a 5 axis mill and a high end 3D printer. If you can afford the mill, you might as well buy a nice printer…

And that reminds me that I should get myself an SLS printer…

Mixing old and new is always fun :yum:
Next is installing the tacho and getting a proper tool post (the lantern post are awful…) So I can make more pulley …
After that, it’s probably gonna be time for a DRO :sweat_smile:

Maybe switching to DC/variable speed at some point?

While not typical “maker” stuff, over the last few months I’ve gotten into bookbinding. I’m working on a longer term project that’s a leather bound version of Dracula and while I’m waiting on tools or supplies I’m making quicker journals.

Here’s the progress on Dracula:




Here are the journals I’ve made:
This is a Japanese Stab Binding

The last two are called a Secret Belgian Binding or a Criss Cross Binding. For these I actually made my own bookcloth.










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That’s crazy cool

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No 3D printing, but I knocked up a forge this weekend. Youtube is awesome.

My shop is at the point now where I’ve got the tools to make more tools. Basically making me significantly more dangerous.

I’m going to a Blacksmith’s guild meeting this weekend. Plus I want to do some small scale casting.

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For me it’s the garage/front yard, but I’m at the same place … It’s an awesome feeling to have something that needs repair/made and be like “dam, I need this wired/obscure tool thingy … Gonna take me a few hour extra to make it …”

Also, nice forge! Hope making one at some point …
Any advantage of a single heat source instead of a few spread lengthwise?

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Mostly propane consumption. A lot of similar builds use two identical burners, just with one a little towards the front, and one a little towards the back. From what I’ve read most two burner setups get run on one burner only most of the time.

If you go to build your own burner;
When you research them on youtube you’ll see everyone sanding a fitting for four flat sides to mount in four screws. I used a brass hex fitting (no sanding) that looks / works much nicer. To get the three evenly spaced holes, I used a 1 inch nut, and bored the thread out to fit on the pipe, then tack welded it into place. That let me clamp it in the drill vice in exactly 120 degree angles for drilling.

I also lined the nut up at the end of the vice so each hole would be at the same height. I’ll get you some pics if you want them.

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