The amazing RFID office chair

A year and and half ago, I set out to create an RFID office chair that logs me in and out of my computer automatically when I sit down or get up, using a strategically placed implant in my backside.

Well, at long last, here it is:

What you need to create this:

The flexEM has roughly a foot of range with this reader, and reads across the entire surface. This means I can twist and turn on the chair, slouch or lean forward and the reader stays latched onto the chip no matter what.

Now, I probably should make it wireless and battery-powered. The serial-cum-power cable running from the chair to the computer doesn’t look great. But I don’t really move that much in that chair, so I never run over it with the casters. I may just keep it as it is.

I love it when a plan comes together :slight_smile:

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And here, for a demonstration of just how much range the flexEM gets, here’s an non-implanted one that I present to the chair:

Sorry for the double beeps, that flexEM too is configured as a dual-EM. So the reader does in fact see two tags come in and out of the field.

That’s a crazy range! How about a similar setup but placed under the desk where the right wrist would rest when using the mouse :thinking: although other implants in the hand might interfere. Anyway great idea!

Absolutely. In fact, you don’t even need a flexEM for that. An xEM will do nicely. That’s the setup I use in my foot. You get many inches of range with an xEM and those parking garage readers.

The flexEM makes sense for the office chair application, because I really wanted to be able to move around and not have to worry about placement whatsoever. And the reader has to read through the whole back of the chair, which is rather thick. Otherwise I reckon an xEM might have done the trick too.

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Sweet set up.
Loving your work as usual

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Thanks. My boss isn’t loving it as much though. I’m supposed to be out of work, and he sees me come in for the sole purpose of fucking up the office furniture. Good thing he’s very supportive of my biohacking endeavors…

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This is the kind of automation I like…automation for the super lazy. If I actually ever locked my computer, I would do something like this. But Id feel more comfortable having some sort of proximity sensor that would turn on the reader for a short time so I’m not sitting 2" in front of a transmitting radio for 8 hours a day.

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You might say that of any and all RFID implant use case. I mean at the end of the day, you can do anything implants do with keys, passwords or payment cards and do away with the implants. In fact, that’s exactly what you did before getting implants. I don’t think it’s about laziness so much as getting rid of cruft in your life: entering passwords got old for me 10 minutes after getting my first Unix account, and it’s not yesterday;

In this case, I already had an implant-based computer unlock solution: my foot reader. The problem was, for automatic locking, I relied on a Wave ID Sonar, and that thing has a habit of locking up the machine when I’m still sitting in front of it but not quite close enough - like when I’m soldering something on the side and trying to see a diagram on the screen.

The RFID chair takes care of that problem.

You don’t know what you’re missing: not only does it log you in, it also breaks kidney stones before they even form :slight_smile:

He probably thinks you’ve gone mad. pacing away from your chair. Then sitting and standing. Then walking away again, standing for a second, then sitting back down again.

I mean, I’m only picturing what it looks like and I think you’ve gone mad. :rofl:
But in a good way.

Oh he knows I’m a couple fries shy of a Happy Meal. And he’s seen me dismantle my very nice company-supplied 350-euro office chair - which he reluctantly allowed on the promise that I can put it all back to how it was without damage. It really is a very nice chair, so I myself didn’t want to ruin it. Still, seeing it in several pieces didn’t fill him with joy.

Fortunately, he and all my workmates also happen to be highly interested in my little implant experiments, and quite amused by them too. So this sort of shenanigans tends to go down well where I work. I¨m phenomenally lucky that they all view me as a walking, talking glimpse into the future.

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Before anyone else jumps on it

I see shoes, everything is a lie

Lol

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Derail

Haha, yeah, but they are not on his feet…
It’s like owning a suit incase of a funeral.

or

Sorry for derail @rosco

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Awesome!

Makes me wonder if I could do the same thing under/around the mousepad area with a hand/forearm implant. :face_with_monocle:

Just run the coil around the bezel of your monitor and wave your hand in front of you to unlock your computer
:grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

Company safety shoes.

It’s part of the few pairs of shoes I like to wear on occasion - like snow boots in winter - so I can continue to enjoy not wearing them the rest of the time instead of walking on stumps :slight_smile:

Kind of like this? :slight_smile:

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DeficientDazzlingFrigatebird-max-1mb

Niiiiiccccceeeee!!! I love it! :grin::+1:

Ah! I finally found a use for my fancy shmancy DT coaster (aside from using it as a coaster, obviously…): if I have to let a mere unimplanted mortal sit in my chair, instead of killing the automatic screen locker, I discreetly throw the coaster on the ACR122U. It’s registered as an authorized tag, so it keeps the session open while I’m not sitting in the chair :slight_smile:

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