UV tattoos and borging up

My octopus and mark of Cain

Hi all, new to this joint but a life long tech geek and a tatted big fat scary guy.

I got an xled for Christmas as well as a xg3. I have been wanting the magnet for a while, but my wife also added the LED for me. The install for the XLED went super smooth into the webbing of my hand, the XG3 not so well into the blade of my hand. I self install both, and I think I was a little more timid then I should have been so my hand is a little scratched up with failed attempts and missed pokes. The LED however is hidden AF.

Below you will see photos of two of my tattoos That are augmented with UV ink.

I’m hoping 2021 brings a few more cosmetics, preferably Blinky, implants that I can fancy myself up with.

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Welcome to the forum.

What colour xLED?

Those Tattoos Look cool as FUCK. I particularly like the Octopus ! :octopus:
I put the pictures here for you, I was guessing your current level prevents Picture uploads
( I hope you don’t mind)

A pity you didn’t have a Cluthu one, @coma would have Unicorn sticker bombed you.

Are you looking at any RFID implants also?

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Here is a place holder for her

1541260860_photo_2018-11-03_15-45-51

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Thanks for the pic post.

I am hoping to find a practical use for some of the more useful implants, they are a lot easier to explain to mundanes as to “why would you do that to yourself” :slight_smile:

I got a red xled - I love it, I just need to figure out a way to power it in a less conspicuous way than shoving my phone up against my hand - wearable or key fob like.

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:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

Keep an eye on this thread

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I store some backup keys to 2fa apps like Discord, the passcode to the backups on Signal, or any other “backup codes” that would be really important to not loose encrypted and stored in my xM1 at the moment. My NEXT is used with NFC Tasks and the Spark 2 is mostly used for logging into my desktop.

Edit: sweet tattoos by the way. That UV ink is really cool.

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Oh, and this one

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Nice - that’s kind of the idea. I am hoping to replace my door keypad with an RF deadbolt or augment it somehow with an ad on piece or something. Also interested in watch that woman did with her tesla key a little while back.

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Amie DD

DT used to sell them, but no longer do.

The Vivokey Apex Range ( Released SOON ™ ) will have it as an applet to do that.
It is only for the Tesla® Model 3 though.

Here is some more Vivokey Apex info for ya :+1:

Sorry mate, I am derailing your thread

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Welcome. Love the ink. Also, obligatory compatibility matrix link to help you sort out the deadbolt:

There is a hardware hack to get the samsung deadbolt working again, info is here on the boards if you think you want to go that route, but there’s no point flooding your intro post with EVERY link :slight_smile:

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Yeah sorry, was at work until now :wink:
But thanks for joining in to the unicorn insanity! :star_struck:

shock

happy

magic

Seriously, looks incredible! Just to get it clear, it’s UV-activated, not glow in the dark, is it? I like how it accentuates the details of both tattoos, but of course, anything with tentacles will be my immediate favorite!^^

On a more practical side - a) how long do you have the ink in, did you have any problems with it during healing time or afterwards and b) how on earth did you get a tattoo artist to tattoo you with it? As far as I know, this stuff is far from being healthy :wink:

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UV reactive tattoo inks are fluorescent because they immediately re-emit the UV light that hits them as new light at a different wavelength. They don’t store any of the energy over time, it’s more like a funhouse mirror. Those inks are usually pretty safe (not significantly carcinogenic), although they do fade in the sun faster than normal tattoo inks.

True glow-ink-the-dark inks are phosphorescent because they store the energy from the light that hits them and release it slowly over time (same mechanism as the xGLO). They’re the ones that are unsafe because they cause allergic reactions and may or may not be highly carcinogenic. They also fade even faster than UV reactive inks so require regular touch ups.

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thanks for the art. :smiley:
and thanks @satur9 for the assist :heavy_check_mark:

these are Black light/UV reactive - so when i am at a minigolf place or a the dentist, you can see the glowee bits.

On a more practical side - a) how long do you have the ink in, did you have any problems with it during healing time or afterwards and b) how on earth did you get a tattoo artist to tattoo you with it? As far as I know, this stuff is far from being healthy

a) the dude who did mine didn’t know much, we kind of learned together :slight_smile: went in pretty ordinarily. these pics are as of yesterday (dec 30) and the octopus was done in 2018 - still as bright and reactive as day one.

b) I supplied the ink, so he was very ok just doing what i asked. it helps to get someone who is ok with working with what you want to do to your own body VS… them pulling the “shut up, im the expert” card.

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Thanks @Satur9 and @LordSethos2000 - didn’t exactly know of the health-related differences between the two kinds of ink, and it’s been some years since I researched all that…

If it’s okay for you (and not too much of a derail), do you happen to have a link to the ink manufacturer? No clue if I could get that stuff in Germany, but might be interesting - especially since my tattoo artist is usually totally fine on experimenting a bit on me :wink:

Such an artist would see me exactly once - when I’m walking out of his door again :wink:

edit:

I would love to have that, in a mostly-biosafe-way… I mean, I have that wonderful glow-in-the-dark implant, but there are several places where implants like that just can’t be placed (on the spine, for example…), and I would just love to have a bioluminescent design all across my body… maybe paired with the scarification, that would just look insane…

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https://www.amazon.com/Moms-VIOLET-Nuclear-Colors-Tattoo/dp/B0114UISQ2/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ll1&tag=reviewpart00-20&linkId=eeed64c070266b0eaf3b9780d4b60121&language=en_US
this is the stuff i used - my body liked it, no problems so far.

you can buy individual bottles as well, just look around online - im certain you will find something in such a mod friendly country like das Vaterland

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Thanks a lot! Gonna dig a bit deeper into that…
Yeah, Germany is very mod friendly - but artists are focused a lot on safety here (I’m actually quite thankful for that), so that there arises no bad publicity that might make our country less mod friendly :wink:
So if there is a doubt about the safety of the ink, it might be hard to get it done here. But once “my” studio is open again, I’m gonna get on their nerves with it :smile:

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When can we order those?

All in good time, my friend

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I have to partly disagree on that one. I agree that there are glow in the dark pigments that are not biocompatible (zinc sulfide based ones). The thing is there are others that actually are biocompstible (strontium aluminate based ones). They are basicly as inert as alumina ceramic (alot of prothesis are made from that). I was actually working on some glow in the dark tattoo ink some time ago. The problem that i had with that was the particle size which made it very hard to keep the particles suspended in the ink. I didn’t continue with that aproach since i was quite busy with other projects after. Injecting a thicker version of that ink with an injection needle directly under the skin works quite well (the picture is from about 8 years after and there were no complications. It also healed quite quickly). The Pigment rubbed into a scarification also works quite well. I bought my strontium aluminate pigment from a genuine supplyer back then. I didn’t use it out of the box since you never know how it’s stored and it’s probably everything but sterile when you receive it. If there if interest i could write down what i did in therms of cleaning before using it. And very important. Even though i didn’t get complications doesn’t mean noone gets complications. This is not fda approved so if you do it always take proper percautions.

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